World T'ai Chi & Qigong Day

-- Medical Research




In addition to the below, be sure to visit our Medical Research Library,
in the menu to your right for much more valuable information.











High Blood Pressure & Tai Chi Therapy:


T'ai Chi lowers blood pressure -- NEW YORK, Mar 02, 1999 (Reuters Health)

SOURCE: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 1999; 47:277-284.

T'ai Chi -- the slow-motion form of exercise popular in China -- can reduce blood pressure in older adults as much as regular aerobic exercise, but without speeding up their heart rates, according to researchers.

These findings ``suggest that (exercise) intensity may be less important than other factors'' when it comes to lowering high blood pressure, conclude researchers led by Dr. Deborah Rohm Young of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions in Baltimore, Maryland. Their study is published in the March issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

After 3 months of Tai Chi practice, Systolic blood pressure (the first number in a reading) declined by an average of 8.4 mm Hg in the T'ai Chi group, and by 7.0 mm Hg in the aerobics group. Diastolic pressure (the second number in a reading) fell by an average of 3.2 mm Hg and 2.4 mm Hg, respectively.





HAWAII MEDICAL JOURNAL, 1992, VOL ID 51, ISSUE ID 8 Participants observed a "big increase in breathing capacity", a disappearance of backaches and neckaches, those with high blood pressure claimed a drop of 10 to 15 mm Hg systolic at rest, and all participants claimed to have more energy in their daily work.





JOURNAL OF PSYCHOSOMATIC RESEARCH, 1989, VOL ID 23, ISSUE ID 2, PAGES 197-206

Relative to measurement beforehand, practice of T'ai Chi raised heart rate, increased nonadrenaline excretion in urine, and decreased salivary cortisol concentration. Relative to baseline levels, [Test Subjects] reported less tension, depression, anger, fatigue, confusion and state-anxiety; they felt more vigorous, and in general they had less total mood disturbance.





NATIONAL MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS SOCIETY JOURNAL

Adaptive Tai Chi; by Seana O’Callaghan - Sept. 2003 Edition

http://www.nationalmssociety.org/IMSJuly03-AdaptiveTaiChi.asp

“Recent clinical studies have confirmed that tai chi produces measurable benefits in improving balance, lowering blood pressure, . . .”



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